Monday, July 13, 2009

Kentucky Reconsiders Diplomas

If a bill by State Senate Republicans passes in Kentucky, they will also be on board with New Hampshire and Louisiana. Why is no one talking about this in the national news?

FRANKFORT — High school students who complete required course work for graduation before their junior or senior years could enroll in college early and get state funding to help with tuition under a plan proposed by Senate Republicans. The bill also would reduce the 22 minimum credit hours for high school graduation to as low as 16, while candidates for early graduation would have to maintain a 2.8 grade-point average to go to a two-year college or 3.2 GPA to go to a four-year university in Kentucky. Students going on to a four-year university also would have to take at least two Advanced Placement classes, the bill says.

It sounds like some real reform is happening at the state level. Wonder what Arne Duncan thinks?

2 comments:

Mrs. C said...

Better still would be the idea of a college entrance exam. It would lessen the need for remedial classes in college. Perhaps we would see several 12-year-olds qualifying and several 18-year-olds out in the dust that way, but it seems more equitable as an A from one school is certainly not equivalent to an A from another.

I don't think "national standards" would change this. I also have to wonder if the schools don't have a vested interest in that money, that they also would keep programs like this very quiet.

Interesting thought, though! At least something new on the table. :]

mazenko said...

We already have college-entrance exams - ACT, PSAT, SAT, SAT II, AP, Placement exams, etc.

However, some colleges will take anyone's money, so they will enroll all, knowing some will never finish. They may just want the cash, or they may believe in the "late bloomer" status of kids.

Secondly, there is the problem of the arbitrary nature or such "tests." Until someone designs the perfect test, colleges won't put all their faith in the College Board